Download
Video player loading...
 
Why Stradivarius violins are worth millions
Why Stradivarius violins are worth millions
Why Stradivarius violins are worth millions

Why Stradivarius violins are worth millions - Vox

Vox
Videos: 963
Subscriber: 5,578,291
Views: 1,249,062,416
If this video violated? Please submit request complaints or delete it right now..
Submit request or Delete this video

Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Mona Lalwani, Valerie Lapinski, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Ellen Rolfes, Mallory Brangan, Ranjani Chakraborty, Madeline Marshall, Kimberly Mas, Danush Parveneh, Christina Thornell, Alvin Chang, Agnes Mazur, Tian Wang, Rachel Abady, and the staff of Vox.com To show us some love, get closer to our work, and creators and get exclusive access to our creators and a peek behind-the-scenes access, become a member of the Vox Video Lab today: http://www.vox.com/join Don’t forget to subscribe so you don't miss a video: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO. For even more Vox, head over to http://www.vox.com To write us: joe@vox.com To request permission to use our videos: permissions@voxmedia.com

Video description
Many musicians prefer these 300-year-old instruments, but are they actually worth it?

Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO

Antonio Stradivari is generally considered the greatest violin maker of all time. His violins are played by some of the top musicians in the world and sell for as much as $16 million. For centuries people have puzzled over what makes his violins so great and they are the most scientifically studied instruments in history. I spoke to two world class violinists who play Stradivarius violins as well as a violin-maker about what makes Stradivari so great.

Special thanks to Stefan Avalos for the Stradivari research footage.

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://goo.gl/0bsAjO.

Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO
Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO
Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO
Why these all-white paintings are in museums and mine aren't

Why do all-white paintings sell for millions of dollars and end up in museums? Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO So-called "white paintings" are in museums all across the world and Robert Ryman's all-white painting "Bridge" sold for a record $20.6 million at a Christie's auction in 2015. How are these seemingly plain white paintings considered art and why is it that not anyone can pick up a tube of white paint and make one? We talk to Elisabeth Sherman, an assistant curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York about why there is much more to these paintings than meets...

Why ships used this camouflage in World War I

Dazzle camouflage was fantastically weird. It was also surprisingly smart. WWII saw another kind of strange history unfold: a meme (yes, really). Watch our video on it here: http://bit.ly/2Co9DEu Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Dazzle camouflage was a surprisingly effective defense against torpedoes. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explains why. World War I ships faced a unique problem. The u-boat was a new threat at the time, and its torpedoes were deadly. That led artist Norman Wilkinson to come up with dazzle camouflage (sometimes called “razzle dazzle camouflage”). The idea was to confuse u-boats about a ship’s course, rather than try...

How this young prince seized power in Saudi Arabia

MBS is transforming Saudi Arabia and the Middle East. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Mohammad bin Salman was designated as Saudi Arabia's new crown prince in June 2017. Since then, he has rapidly consolidated power and led Saudi Arabia towards some progressive reforms, such as granting women the right to drive. He also has plans to privatize certain segments of the economy, with the goal of reducing Saudi Arabia's economic dependency on oil. These changes, along with a suppression of Saudi Arabia's religious Right, could potentially begin to destabilize one of the Middle East's most powerful nations. Listen to this episode of Worldly...

What a conductor actually does on stage

It’s more than just dancing around. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO If you’ve ever seen an orchestra perform you’ve probably had a difficult time looking away from the person dead center on the stage – the conductor. It’s hard to miss someone as they swing their arms around pointing at the musicians that seem to be focused instead on their music stands. So what exactly is the conductor doing? We decided to ask James Gaffigan – a conductor who recently guest conducted the New York Philharmonic in Central Park – just what it is that makes a conductor so necessary and how...

Meet the designer cats with wild blood

Bengals, Savannahs, and Toygers, explained. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. By breeding house cats with wild animals, humans developed hybrid cats that look like little leopards. Bengal cats are a breed that was developed by breeding domestic cats with asian leopard cats. The first American bengal breeder is a woman named Jean Mill, but her work has continued through other breeders. We...

The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.

Biomimicry design, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: https://99percentinvisible.org/ Subscribe to our channel here: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Japan’s Shinkansen doesn’t look like your typical train. With its long and pointed nose, it can reach top speeds up to 150–200 miles per hour. It didn’t always look like this. Earlier models were rounder and louder, often suffering from the phenomenon of "tunnel boom," where deafening compressed air would rush out of a tunnel after a train rushed in. But a moment of inspiration from engineer and birdwatcher Eiji Nakatsu led the system to be redesigned based on the aerodynamics of three species...

The dollhouses of death that changed forensic science

Frances Glessner Lee created dollhouses with dead dolls. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox's Phil Edwards explains why. Follow Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Frances Glessner Lee's "Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death" are part of a new exhibit at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Art museum. The collection is part art, part science, and part creepy peek into the world of forensic science. These miniatures significantly advanced forensics and forensic science, but they aren't just CSI curios - they're complex, confounding works of art that manage to be morbid and beautiful at the same time. Lee's legacy bridges both the...

How obsessive artists colorize old photos

Photo colorization artists use a combination of research, physics, and technology to digitally reconstruct history's black and white record. Artist links: Jordan Lloyd (@jordanjlloydhq): http://dynamichrome.com/ Mads Madsen (@Madsmadsench): http://www.colorized-history.com/ Marina Amaral (@marinamaral2): http://www.marinamaral.com/ Dana Keller (@HistoryInColor): http://www.danarkeller.com/ Patty Allison (@imbuedwithhues): https://imbuedwithhues.wordpress.com/ The Paper Time Machine: https://unbound.com/books/paper-time-machine Photo colorization isn’t just coloring within the lines — it requires meticulous research to make sure that every detail is historically accurate. The color of military uniforms, signs, vehicles, and world fashion spanning decades needs to be accounted for before even opening digital software like Photoshop. That means digging through sources like diaries, government records, old advertisements, and even consulting...

Why Cuban cab drivers earn more than doctors

In Cuba, cab drivers are the one percent Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Cuba’s economy works as a central planning model, where government ministries dole out resources and set everything from prices to inventories to salaries. The fact that a taxi driver can make so much more than a physician is a reflection of the Cuban government’s heavy focus on tourism. For years, the central planning apparatus has valued tourism as a key mechanism for both bringing in revenue as well as propagating the idea that Cuba is thriving. Many pesos are collected by the high prices on everything related to the...

Why the triple axel is such a big deal

Triple axels can turn skaters into legends. This is why. Watch the rest of Skate Week, and our other sports explainers, here: http://bit.ly/2FfxM17 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Note: The video states Mirai Nagasu was the second American to land a triple axel in competition (this was recorded before her Olympic success). In 2005, American Kimmy Miessner completed a triple axel in national competition, though not world competition. You can read about it here: http://www.espn.com/olympics/news/story?id=1967992 Want to see Tonya' Harding's routine? You can find one version here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdC5G7CDvbI In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores the triple axel and why it's such a big...

The world's greatest internet troll explains his craft

Ken M. is probably the world's greatest internet troll. Is it trolling to pick the world's greatest troll? You be the judge. But this is how Ken M does it. Find more about Ken below: Ken M on Twitter: https://twitter.com/horseysurprise Ken M on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kenmofficial/ Ken M on Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/KenM/ Ken M on Tumblr: http://horseysurprise.tumblr.com/ Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the...

How Jackson Pollock became so overrated

There’s an overlooked reason for Pollock’s fame. Even if you love him, you might not know the name of the man who made him famous. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Jackson Pollock is one of the 20th century’s most famous artists. But do you know the critic who made his reputation? Clement Greenberg is a well-known name in the art world, but not necessarily to art fans. However, he earned a reputation as one of the most influential art critics in the 20th century, whose legacy included the canonization of Jackson Pollock. Abstract expressionist art needed vocal champions to support challenging, unique work, and...

Why no aquarium has a great white shark

Many have tried to keep a white shark in captivity. Here's why that's so difficult. There are several aquariums around the world, including one in Georgia, that house whale sharks, the biggest fish in the sea. But not one has a great white shark on display. Aquariums have made dozens of attempts since the 1970s to display a captive great white shark. Most of those attempts ended with dead sharks. By the 2000s, the only group still trying was the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which spent a decade planning its white shark program. In 2004, it acquired a shark that became the...

Why we say “OK”

How a cheesy joke from the 1830s became the most widely spoken word in the world. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO OK is thought to be the most widely recognized word on the planet. We use it to communicate with each other, as well as our technology. But it actually started out as a language fad in the 1830’s of abbreviating words incorrectly. Young intellectuals in Boston came up with several of these abbreviations, including “KC” for “knuff ced,” “OW” for “oll wright,” and KY for “know yuse.” But thanks to its appearance in Martin Van Buren’s 1840 presidential re-election campaign as...

How a recording-studio mishap shaped '80s music

Warning: This is an unapologetic ode to gated reverb drums Here's a Spotify playlist of some of the best gated reverb songs: http://spoti.fi/2vH7ZZL Over the past few years a general nostalgia for the 1980s has infiltrated music, film, and television. I deeply love those gated reverb drums of the '80s - you know that punchy percussive sound popularized by Phil Collins and Prince? So for my second episode of Vox Pop’s Earworm I spoke with two Berklee College of Music professors, Susan Rogers and Prince Charles Alexander, to figure out just how that sound came to be, what makes it so...

Kellyanne Conway's interview tricks, explained

Kellyanne Conway has a supernatural ability to derail any interview that paints Donald Trump in a negative light. How does she do it? Follow Strikethrough on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/CarlosMazaVox/ Watching Conway do backflips to avoid answering simple questions is fascinating and occasionally entertaining, but it doesn’t provide viewers with useful information about what the Trump administration is doing or intends to do. And it should raise questions about what the purpose of interviewing an administration official actually is. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines....

The (mostly) true story of hobo graffiti

What we know about hobo graffiti comes from hobos — a group that took pride in embellishing stories. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Hobos, or tramps, were itinerant workers and wanderers who illegally hopped freight cars on the newly expanding railroad in the United States in the late 19th century. They used graffiti, also known as tramp writing, as a messaging system to tell their fellow travelers...

What a war with North Korea would look like

Five experts discuss what a war on the Korean peninsula would look like, how close we are to conflict, and the terrifying consequences. Read about the implications of war with North Korea on Vox.com: http://bit.ly/2nNK2ei With tensions between the US and North Korea escalating, we asked a group of experts including Senator Tammy Duckworth, about the likelihood and consequences of reigniting war on the Korean Peninsula. International sanctions have put pressure on the North Korean regime, but they have yet to capitulate to US demands to unilaterally disarm their nuclear armaments program. The Trump administration had cited this as a requirement for...

McMansions: The houses that people love to hate

There’s a certain type of house that people love to hate. They're called "McMansions," and architecture critic Kate Wagner has dedicated her website, McMansion Hell, to explaining why these houses rub people the wrong way. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2qiJ4dy Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/

Decoding the ancient astronomy of Stonehenge

The solstice alignments of Stonehenge, explained. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Note: A previous version of this video referred imprecisely to "Neolithic Britain" when discussing the Newgrange tomb in Ireland. We have removed that phrasing. My apologies to the Irish. Sources: https://www.amazon.com/Stonehenge-Understanding-Mysteries-Greatest-Monument-ebook/dp/B00BBF8FLY/ref=sr_1_1 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BPEITG2/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 http://media.astronomicalheritage.net/media/astronomicalheritage.net/entity_000006/ras_stonehenge_factsheet.pdf http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/history/# http://www.atmo.arizona.edu/students/courselinks/fall07/nats101s31/lecture_notes/sunpaths.html https://archive.org/details/themysteryofstonehenge Newgrange photos by: Sean MacEntee https://www.flickr.com/photos/smemon/22454487890 Pdbreen https://www.flickr.com/photos/pdbreen/3796235534 /// Stonehenge is a popular destination for summer solstice celebrations because the 5,000-year-old monument points toward the summer solstice sunrise on the horizon. However, it also points to the winter solstice sunset in the opposite direction and there's good reason to believe that this may have been the more important alignment for the Neolithic people who built Stonehenge. We...

How J Dilla humanized his MPC3000

J Dilla made his MPC3000 musical. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO There's a halo of reverence around J Dilla, a producer and beatmaker from Detroit who made some of the most fascinating and influential beats in hip hop history. Before his early death in 2006, J Dilla worked with countless artists and producers - from Erykah Badu and Janet Jackson to Busta Rhymes and Madlib - and developed an off-kilter style of rhythm and sampling that transcended the machine he used to create music, the Akai Midi Production Center, otherwise known as the MPC. Spotify Playlist created by Okayplayer: https://open.spotify.com/user/okayplayer87/playlist/0Xd9a6zJMMYLURcINKVkQd Brian...

Why danger symbols can’t last forever

How to design fear, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: http://99pi.org Correction: The correct spelling of “warning” in Persian is هشدار. Watch the previous episode from this series: http://bit.ly/2DDIQAL Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Chances are you wouldn’t be able to recognize a biohazard even if you were looking right at one. But the biohazard symbol? It’s pretty easy to spot. Most warning icons rely on previously established objects or symbols: a general caution might use an exclamation point, and a fire warning might use an illustration of a flame. But the biohazard symbol references an idea that is much harder to picture — and...

The hunt for Forrest Fenn's $2 million hidden treasure

The secret is hidden in a poem that starts like this: "Begin it where warm waters halt." Zack wrote an entire feature filled with maps, illustrated clues, and even more video. You can read and watch here: http://www.vox.com/a/fenn-treasure-hunt-map Sometime between 2009 and 2010 an 80 year old man by the name of Forrest Fenn trekked out into the Rocky Mountains and hid a bronze chest filled with over $2 million dollars worth of treasure. The secret to the location of the treasure is contained within a six stanza poem. Forrest Fenn's treasure, as it's come to be known, has captivated men, women,...

The real reason Amelia Earhart is so famous

A carefully executed publicity campaign turned a pretty average pilot into an aviation legend. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Amelia Earhart is often thought of as the first or greatest female pilot of her time. But the real reason she is seen as an aviation legend comes from a carefully executed publicity campaign starting with her transatlantic passenger flight in 1928, which launched her out of obscurity and into celebrity status. From there, she pursued an ambitious career of record-breaking and stunts in order to stay in the headlines and fund her aviation career. Vox.com is a news website that helps...

The secret rhythm behind Radiohead's "Videotape"

Welcome to Vox Pop: Earworm! In my first episode of Earworm, I speak with Warren Lain. He's a Radiohead fan who also happens to be an incredibly talented musician and music teacher. In December 2016 he uploaded a 38 minute video to YouTube about a Radiohead song that I deeply love, "Videotape." He had been thinking about the music theory behind this seemingly simple song for the better part of a decade. The reason? “Videotape”, a slow rhythmically monotonous song, is actually syncopated. I’m joined also by Erin Barra, a professor at Berklee College of Music, who helped Warren and I...