Download
Video player loading...
 
Why should you listen to Vivaldi's "Four Seasons"? - Betsy Schwarm
Why should you listen to Vivaldi's "Four Seasons"? - Betsy Schwarm
Why should you listen to Vivaldi's "Four Seasons"? - Betsy Schwarm

Why should you listen to Vivaldi's "Four Seasons"? - Betsy Schwarm - TED-Ed

TED-Ed
Videos: 1,479
Subscriber: 7,245,031
Views: 1,053,410,813
If this video violated? Please submit request complaints or delete it right now..
Submit request or Delete this video

TED-Ed’s commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED’s mission of spreading great ideas. Within TED-Ed’s growing library of TED-Ed animations, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed website (ed.ted.com). Want to suggest an idea for a TED-Ed animation or get involved with TED-Ed? Visit our website at: http://ed.ted.com/get_involved. Also, consider donating to us on Patreon! By doing so, you directly support our mission and receive some pretty awesome rewards: https://www.patreon.com/teded

Video description
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-should-you-listen-to-vivaldi-s-four-seasons-betsy-schwarm

Light, bright, and cheerful, "The Four Seasons" by Antonio Vivaldi is some of the most familiar of all early 18th century music, featured in numerous films and television commercials. But what is its significance, and why does it sound that way? Betsy Schwarm uncovers the underlying narrative of this musical masterpiece.

Lesson by Betsy Schwarm, animation by Compote Collective.
The Infinite Hotel Paradox - Jeff Dekofsky

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-infinite-hotel-paradox-jeff-dekofsky Want more? Try to solve the buried treasure riddle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCeklW2e6_E The Infinite Hotel, a thought experiment created by German mathematician David Hilbert, is a hotel with an infinite number of rooms. Easy to comprehend, right? Wrong. What if it's completely booked but one person wants to check in? What about 40? Or an infinitely full bus of people? Jeff Dekofsky solves these heady lodging issues using Hilbert's paradox. Lesson by Jeff Dekofsky, animation by The Moving Company Animation Studio.

Why do animals have such different lifespans? - Joao Pedro de Magalhaes

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-animals-have-such-different-lifespans-joao-pedro-de-magalhaes For the microscopic lab worm C. elegans, life equates to just a few short weeks on Earth. The bowhead whale, on the other hand, can live over two hundred years. Why are these lifespans so different? And what does it really mean to ‘age' anyway? Joao Pedro de Magalhaes explains why the pace of aging varies greatly across animals. Lesson by Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, animation by Sharon Colman.

The wars that inspired Game of Thrones - Alex Gendler

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-wars-that-inspired-game-of-thrones-alex-gendler Beginning around 1377, medieval England was shaken by a power struggle between two noble families, which spanned generations and involved a massive cast of characters, complex motives and shifting loyalties. Sound familiar? Alex Gendler illustrates how the historical conflict known as the Wars of the Roses served as the basis for much of the drama in Game of Thrones. Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Brett Underhill.

What is Zeno's Dichotomy Paradox? - Colm Kelleher

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-is-zeno-s-dichotomy-paradox-colm-kelleher Can you ever travel from one place to another? Ancient Greek philosopher Zeno of Elea gave a convincing argument that all motion is impossible - but where's the flaw in his logic? Colm Kelleher illustrates how to resolve Zeno's Dichotomy Paradox. Lesson by Colm Kelleher, animation by Buzzco Associates, inc.

The unexpected math behind Van Gogh's "Starry Night" - Natalya St. Clair

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-unexpected-math-behind-van-gogh-s-starry-night-natalya-st-clair Physicist Werner Heisenberg said, “When I meet God, I am going to ask him two questions: why relativity? And why turbulence? I really believe he will have an answer for the first.” As difficult as turbulence is to understand mathematically, we can use art to depict the way it looks. Natalya St. Clair illustrates how Van Gogh captured this deep mystery of movement, fluid and light in his work. Lesson by Natalya St. Clair, animation by Avi Ofer.

10 Times Michio Kaku Arguments Blew Our Minds

If you like this video don't forget to like and subscribe http://goo.gl/dgHQSp ==================================================== Follow us: * Facebook: https://goo.gl/2dSG31 * Twitter: https://goo.gl/IMm1ig * Site: https://goo.gl/qBX8hJ ==================================================== Michio Kaku is the co-founder of String Field Theory and is the author of international best-selling books such as Hyperspace, Visions, and Beyond Einstein. Michio Kaku is the Henry Semat Professor in Theoretical Physics at the City University of New York. 10 Times Michio Kaku Arguments Blew Our Minds ==================================================== FAIR-USE COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER * Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, commenting, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. - This video...

The psychology of narcissism - W. Keith Campbell

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-psychology-of-narcissism-w-keith-campbell Narcissism isn’t just a personality type that shows up in advice columns; it’s actually a set of traits classified and studied by psychologists. But what causes it? And can narcissists improve on their negative traits? W. Keith Campbell describes the psychology behind the elevated and sometimes detrimental self-involvement of narcissists. Lesson by W. Keith Campbell, animation by TOGETHER.

Why are some people left-handed? - Daniel M. Abrams

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-are-some-people-left-handed-daniel-m-abrams Today, about one-tenth of the world’s population are southpaws. Why are such a small proportion of people left-handed -- and why does the trait exist in the first place? Daniel M. Abrams investigates how the uneven ratio of lefties and righties gives insight into a balance between competitive and cooperative pressures on human evolution. Lesson by Daniel M. Abrams, animation by TED-Ed.

The Egyptian Book of the Dead: A guidebook for the underworld - Tejal Gala

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-egyptian-book-of-the-dead-tejal-gala Ancient Egyptians believed that in order to become immortal after death, a spirit must first pass through the underworld — a realm of vast caverns, lakes of fire, and magical gates. Needless to say, one needed to come prepared. But how? Tejal Gala describes an Egyptian "Book of the Dead" -- a customized magic scroll written by the living to promote a smooth passage to the afterlife when they died. Lesson by Tejal Gala, animation by Silvia Prietov.

Why can't you divide by zero? - TED-Ed

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-can-t-you-divide-by-zero In the world of math, many strange results are possible when we change the rules. But there’s one rule that most of us have been warned not to break: don’t divide by zero. How can the simple combination of an everyday number and a basic operation cause such problems? Lesson by TED-Ed, animation by Nick Hilditch. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Craig Sheldon, Andrew Bosco, Nik Maier, Adi V, Hiroshi Uchiyama, Chris , Vik Nagjee, Della Palacios, Alexander Walls, سلطان...

The benefits of a bilingual brain - Mia Nacamulli

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-speaking-multiple-languages-benefits-the-brain-mia-nacamulli It’s obvious that knowing more than one language can make certain things easier — like traveling or watching movies without subtitles. But are there other advantages to having a bilingual (or multilingual) brain? Mia Nacamulli details the three types of bilingual brains and shows how knowing more than one language keeps your brain healthy, complex and actively engaged. Lesson by Mia Nacamulli, animation by TED-Ed.

Schrödinger's cat: A thought experiment in quantum mechanics - Chad Orzel

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/schrodinger-s-cat-a-thought-experiment-in-quantum-mechanics-chad-orzel Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger, one of the founders of quantum mechanics, posed this famous question: If you put a cat in a sealed box with a device that has a 50% chance of killing the cat in the next hour, what will be the state of the cat when that time is up? Chad Orzel investigates this thought experiment. Lesson by Chad Orzel, animation by Agota Vegso.

Four Seasons ~ Vivaldi

Antonio Vivaldi - Four Seasons Budapest Strings Bela Banfalvi, Conductor You can get the exact album I have here on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1I2dNNu (affiliate). Here are the times for the specific movements: Spring 0:00 Summer 10:31 Autumn 20:59 Winter 32:48 I hope you love this recording! It is my favorite one I've heard yet. Happy Listening! AnAmericanComposer

Did Shakespeare write his plays? - Natalya St. Clair and Aaron Williams

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/did-shakespeare-write-his-plays-natalya-st-clair-and-aaron-williams Some people question whether Shakespeare really wrote the works that bear his name – or whether he even existed at all. Could it be true that the greatest writer in the English language was as fictional as his plays? Natalya St. Clair and Aaron Williams show how a linguistic tool called stylometry might shed light on the answer. Lesson by Natalya St. Clair and Aaron Williams, animation by Pink Kong Studios.

Music and math: The genius of Beethoven - Natalya St. Clair

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/music-and-math-the-genius-of-beethoven-natalya-st-clair How is it that Beethoven, who is celebrated as one of the most significant composers of all time, wrote many of his most beloved songs while going deaf? The answer lies in the math behind his music. Natalya St. Clair employs the "Moonlight Sonata" to illustrate the way Beethoven was able to convey emotion and creativity using the certainty of mathematics. Lesson by Natalya St. Clair, animation by Qa'ed Mai.

The Epic of Gilgamesh: Crash Course World Mythology #26

This week, we're continuing our discussion of heroes by talking about Gilgamesh, star of one of the earliest written hero stories, The Epic of Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh was a terrible ancient king who left his kingdom seeking adventure, and eventually on the prowl for immortality. Along the way, he checks pretty much all the boxes on the checklist of Joseph Campbell's Hero's Journey. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Truman Way, Thomas Frank, Indika...

After watching this, your brain will not be the same | Lara Boyd | TEDxVancouver

In a classic research-based TEDx Talk, Dr. Lara Boyd describes how neuroplasticity gives you the power to shape the brain you want. Recorded at TEDxVancouver at Rogers Arena on November 14, 2015. YouTube Tags: brain science, brain, stroke, neuroplasticity, science, motor learning, identity, TED, TEDxVancouver, TEDxVancouver 2015, Vancouver, TEDx, Rogers Arena, Vancouver speakers, Vancouver conference, ideas worth spreading, great idea, Our knowledge of the brain is evolving at a breathtaking pace, and Dr. Lara Boyd is positioned at the cutting edge of these discoveries. In 2006, she was recruited by the University of British Columbia to become the Canada Research Chair in...

Why incompetent people think they're amazing - David Dunning

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-incompetent-people-think-they-re-amazing-david-dunning How good are you with money? What about reading people’s emotions? How healthy are you, compared to other people you know? Knowing how our skills stack up against others is useful in many ways. But psychological research suggests that we’re not very good at evaluating ourselves accurately. In fact, we frequently overestimate our own abilities. David Dunning describes the Dunning-Kruger effect. Lesson by David Dunning, directed by Wednesday Studio, music and sound by Tom Drew. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be...

The mathematical secrets of Pascal’s triangle - Wajdi Mohamed Ratemi

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-mathematical-secrets-of-pascal-s-triangle-wajdi-mohamed-ratemi Pascal’s triangle, which at first may just look like a neatly arranged stack of numbers, is actually a mathematical treasure trove. But what about it has so intrigued mathematicians the world over? Wajdi Mohamed Ratemi shows how Pascal's triangle is full of patterns and secrets. Lesson by Wajdi Mohamed Ratemi, animation by Henrik Malmgren.

How much of human history is on the bottom of the ocean? - Peter Campbell

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-much-of-human-history-is-on-the-bottom-of-the-ocean-peter-campbell Sunken relics, ghostly shipwrecks, and lost cities aren’t just wonders found in fictional adventures. Beneath the ocean’s surface, there are ruins where people once roamed and shipwrecks loaded with artifacts from another time. Peter Campbell takes us into the huge underwater museum that is our ocean to see what these artifacts can tell us about humanity. Lesson by Peter Campbell, animation by Blind Pig.

Why is this painting so captivating? - James Earle and Christina Bozsik

View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-is-this-painting-so-captivating-james-earle-and-christina-bozsik On first glance, the painting “Las Meninas” (“The Maids of Honor”) might not seem terribly special, but it’s actually one of the most analyzed pieces in the history of art. Why is this painting by Diego Velazquez so captivating? James Earle and Christina Bozsik share the context and complexity behind this work of art. Lesson by James Earle and Christina Bozsik, animation by Zedem Media.

How playing an instrument benefits your brain - Anita Collins

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-playing-an-instrument-benefits-your-brain-anita-collins When you listen to music, multiple areas of your brain become engaged and active. But when you actually play an instrument, that activity becomes more like a full-body brain workout. What's going on? Anita Collins explains the fireworks that go off in musicians' brains when they play, and examines some of the long-term positive effects of this mental workout. Lesson by Anita Collins, animation by Sharon Colman Graham.

5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/5-tips-to-improve-your-critical-thinking-samantha-agoos Every day, a sea of decisions stretches before us, and it’s impossible to make a perfect choice every time. But there are many ways to improve our chances — and one particularly effective technique is critical thinking. Samantha Agoos describes a 5-step process that may help you with any number of problems. Lesson by Samantha Agoos, animation by Nick Hilditch.