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Why old buildings use the same leaf design
Why old buildings use the same leaf design
Why old buildings use the same leaf design

Why old buildings use the same leaf design - Vox

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Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Mona Lalwani, Valerie Lapinski, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Ellen Rolfes, Mallory Brangan, Ranjani Chakraborty, Madeline Marshall, Kimberly Mas, Danush Parveneh, Christina Thornell, Alvin Chang, Agnes Mazur, Tian Wang, Rachel Abady, and the staff of Vox.com To show us some love, get closer to our work, and creators and get exclusive access to our creators and a peek behind-the-scenes access, become a member of the Vox Video Lab today: http://www.vox.com/join Don’t forget to subscribe so you don't miss a video: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO. For even more Vox, head over to http://www.vox.com To write us: joe@vox.com To request permission to use our videos: permissions@voxmedia.com

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There’s a reason almost every column has the same leaves…

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In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores why columns look the way they do — in particular, the leave-strewn Corinthian columns you’ll often see on buildings (both old and new).

These leaves actually have an originating myth courtesy of the writer Vitruvius, creing Callimachus for the Corinthian column design. The acanthus leaves on the column have remained consistent over millennia, and, over time, have come to represent more than just a sturdy plant.

They’re on display in this video at the National Arboretum, where columns that used to sit on the United States Capitol have been relocated. These striking columns aren’t just a historical record — they’re a symbol of how Corinthian design and acanthus leaves manage to endure over time.

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