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The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.
The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.
The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.

The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps. - Vox

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Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives, on everything from Taxes to Terrorism to Taylor Swift. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Dean Peterson, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Valerie Lapinski, Mona Lalwani, and the staff of Vox.com. For much much more, head over to www.vox.com. And subscribe so you don't miss a video at http://goo.gl/0bsAjO To write us: joe@vox.com. To request permission to use our videos: permissions@voxmedia.com

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Biomimicry design, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here:  https://99percentinvisible.org/

Subscribe to our channel here: https://99percentinvisible.org/

Japan’s Shinkansen doesn’t look like your typical train. With its long and pointed nose, it can reach top speeds up to 150–200 miles per hour.

It didn’t always look like this. Earlier models were rounder and louder, often suffering from the phenomenon of "tunnel boom," where deafening compressed air would rush out of a tunnel after a train rushed in. But a moment of inspiration from engineer and birdwatcher Eiji Nakatsu led the system to be redesigned based on the aerodynamics of three species of birds.

Nakatsu’s case is a fascinating example of biomimicry, the design movement pioneered by biologist and writer Janine Benyus. She's a co-founder of the Biomimicry Institute, a non-profit encouraging creators to discover how big challenges in design, engineering, and sustainability have often already been solved through 3.8 billion years of evolution on earth. We just have to go out and find them.

This is one of a series of videos we're launching in partnership with 99% Invisible, an awesome podcast about design. 99% Invisible is a member of https://99percentinvisible.org/

Adional imagery from the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://99percentinvisible.org/

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out https://99percentinvisible.org/ to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app.

Check out our full video catalog: https://99percentinvisible.org/
Follow Vox on Twitter: https://99percentinvisible.org/
Or on Facebook: https://99percentinvisible.org/
Why cities are full of uncomfortable benches

That bench won't be yours forever. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When designing urban spaces, city planners have many competing interests to balance. After all, cities are some of the most diverse places on the planet. They need to be built for a variety of needs. In recent years, these competing interests have surfaced conflict over an unlikely interest: purposefully uncomfortable benches. Enter the New York City MTA. They’ve installed 'leaning bars’ to supplement traditional benches & save platform space. But designs like this carry an often invisible cost: they rob citizens of hospitable public space. And the people who experience this cost...

See How Termites Inspired a Building That Can Cool Itself | National Geographic

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How wildlife films warp time

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The bizarre physics of fire ants

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The surprising pattern behind color names around the world

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Why graphene hasn’t taken over the world...yet

Graphene is a form of carbon that could bring us bulletproof armor and space elevators, improve medicine, and make the internet run faster — some day. For the past 15 years, consumers have been hearing about this wonder material and all the ways it could change everything. Is it really almost here, or is it another promise that is perpetually just one more breakthrough away? Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2FqJZMl Like Verge Science on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hoSukO Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2Kr29B9 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com Community guidelines: http://bit.ly/2D0hlAv Subscribe to Verge on YouTube for explainers, product reviews, technology news, and more: http://goo.gl/G5RXGs

Thin underwater cables hold the internet. See a map of them all.

Your internet isn't just underwater. It's also covered in Vaseline. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Map by TeleGeography: http://www.submarinecablemap.com/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The internet is known to pulse through fiber optic cables and cell phone towers, but 99% of high-speed international information is transferred under the sea. How long has this been happening? Underwater cables delivering information isn't a novel idea — the first Transatlantic cable was laid in 1858—undersea cables have been around since the telegraph. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The Simple Solution to Traffic

The way we can make traffic disappear. Discuss this video: http://reddit.com/r/cgpgrey Brought to you in part by: http://www.audible.com/grey Special Thanks to: Mark Govea, Thomas J Miller Jr MD, dedla , Robert Kunz, Saki Comandao, hcblue , John Buchan, Andres Villacres, Christian Cooper, Michael Little, PervertedThomas , Nevin Spoljaric, rictic , Ian , Faust Fairbrook, Jason Lewandowski, Michael Mrozek, Jordan LeDoux, Chris Woodall, سليمان العقل, Tony DiLascio, Richard Jenkins, Chris Chapin, Tod Kurt, Chang Wang, Kozo Ota, Phil Gardner, Jordan Melville, Martin , Steven Grimm, Joe Pantry, Benjamin Morrison, Colin Millions, Muhammad Shifaz, Chris Harshman, Jose Reyes, Guillermo , Ron Bowes, Tómas Árni...

How a 15-year-old solved a Rubik's Cube in 5.25 seconds

Rubik's Cube world record-holder Collin Burns tells us how he did it. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO YouTube sources: Collin Burns https://www.youtube.com/user/collinbxyz RECuber https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpFpW3tRN0xtxuaEJvdCggA Tony Fisher https://www.youtube.com/user/KaiXevandStanley Feliks Zemdegs https://www.youtube.com/user/fazrulz1 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How America became a superpower

America grew from a colony to a superpower in 200 years. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO 2:07 Correction: Cuba seceded from the US in 1902. With over 800 military bases around the globe, the US is easily the most powerful nation on earth. But it wasn't always this way. The US once played an insignificant role in global affairs. In this 8-minute video, you can see the transformation. Military budget data: https://www.nationalpriorities.org/campaigns/military-spending-united-states/ US foreign bases based on David Vine's book, "Base Nation" http://www.davidvine.net/base-nation.html Troop numbers: "Total Military Personnel and Dependent End Strength By Service, Regional Area, and Country". Defense Manpower Data Center. November 7,...

How the inventor of Mario designs a game

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Why all world maps are wrong

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The high cost of free parking

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The 'duck curve' is solar energy's greatest challenge

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Why America still uses Fahrenheit

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Why Starbucks Failed In Australia

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How fan films shaped The Lego Movie

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Why the ocean is getting louder

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Open offices are overrated

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