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The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.
The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.
The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.

The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps. - Vox

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Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives, on everything from Taxes to Terrorism to Taylor Swift. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Dean Peterson, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Valerie Lapinski, Mona Lalwani, and the staff of Vox.com. For much much more, head over to www.vox.com. And subscribe so you don't miss a video at http://goo.gl/0bsAjO To write us: joe@vox.com. To request permission to use our videos: permissions@voxmedia.com

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Biomimicry design, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here:  https://99percentinvisible.org/

Subscribe to our channel here: https://99percentinvisible.org/

Japan’s Shinkansen doesn’t look like your typical train. With its long and pointed nose, it can reach top speeds up to 150–200 miles per hour.

It didn’t always look like this. Earlier models were rounder and louder, often suffering from the phenomenon of "tunnel boom," where deafening compressed air would rush out of a tunnel after a train rushed in. But a moment of inspiration from engineer and birdwatcher Eiji Nakatsu led the system to be redesigned based on the aerodynamics of three species of birds.

Nakatsu’s case is a fascinating example of biomimicry, the design movement pioneered by biologist and writer Janine Benyus. She's a co-founder of the Biomimicry Institute, a non-profit encouraging creators to discover how big challenges in design, engineering, and sustainability have often already been solved through 3.8 billion years of evolution on earth. We just have to go out and find them.

This is one of a series of videos we're launching in partnership with 99% Invisible, an awesome podcast about design. 99% Invisible is a member of https://99percentinvisible.org/

Adional imagery from the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://99percentinvisible.org/

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out https://99percentinvisible.org/ to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app.

Check out our full video catalog: https://99percentinvisible.org/
Follow Vox on Twitter: https://99percentinvisible.org/
Or on Facebook: https://99percentinvisible.org/
Why cities are full of uncomfortable benches

That bench won't be yours forever. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When designing urban spaces, city planners have many competing interests to balance. After all, cities are some of the most diverse places on the planet. They need to be built for a variety of needs. In recent years, these competing interests have surfaced conflict over an unlikely interest: purposefully uncomfortable benches. Enter the New York City MTA. They’ve installed 'leaning bars’ to supplement traditional benches & save platform space. But designs like this carry an often invisible cost: they rob citizens of hospitable public space. And the people who experience this cost...

Why cartoon characters wear gloves

Animators had a few tricks up their slee...err gloves. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How America became a superpower

America grew from a colony to a superpower in 200 years. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO 2:07 Correction: Cuba seceded from the US in 1902. With over 800 military bases around the globe, the US is easily the most powerful nation on earth. But it wasn't always this way. The US once played an insignificant role in global affairs. In this 8-minute video, you can see the transformation. Military budget data: https://www.nationalpriorities.org/campaigns/military-spending-united-states/ US foreign bases based on David Vine's book, "Base Nation" http://www.davidvine.net/base-nation.html Troop numbers: "Total Military Personnel and Dependent End Strength By Service, Regional Area, and Country". Defense Manpower Data Center. November 7,...

How free games are designed to make money

"Freemium" games can end up gaming gamers. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How fan films shaped The Lego Movie

The 2014 film was an animation feat — but it was built on the legacy of homemade fan movies. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When you watch installments of the Warner Bros. line of Lego movies, it's hard not to be struck by how realistic the animation is. It isn't quite traditional stop motion — but it sure looks as if it could be. That's largely thanks to the work of the animators at Animal Logic, a Sydney-based visual effects studio that has worked on The Lego Movie, The Lego Batman Movie, and the upcoming The Lego Ninjago Movie. Powered by live...

How the inventor of Mario designs a game

Shigeru Miyamoto's design philosophy, explained. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The hidden oil patterns on bowling lanes

Every bowling lane has a hidden oil pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards finds out what that means. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Every lane has a pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores how they change the game. Bowling isn’t just about a great ball and good form — if you want to understand the sport, you have to understand the lane. Every bowling lane, including the one in your neighborhood alley, is coated with an oil pattern to protect the wood. But these patterns aren’t just for protection —...

Going green shouldn't be this hard

Going green does not need to be a sacrifice, either for us as individuals or for businesses, governments and the economy. This is the second episode of Climate Lab, a six-part series produced by the University of California in partnership with Vox. Hosted by Emmy-nominated conservation scientist Dr. M. Sanjayan, the videos explore the surprising elements of our lives that contribute to climate change and the groundbreaking work being done to fight back. Featuring conversations with experts, scientists, thought leaders and activists, the series takes what can seem like an overwhelming problem and breaks it down into manageable parts: from clean...

How a mathematician dissects a coincidence

Can you unknot a twist of fate with logic? Vox's Phil Edwards asked mathematician Joseph Mazur about his book, Fluke, and one of its most incredible stories. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Find a link to the book and more information here: http://www.vox.com/2016/10/31/13457236/mathematician-joe-mazur-fluke-coincidence You can find more information and links to the book on Vox.com. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian...

Why old buildings use the same leaf design

There’s a reason almost every column has the same leaves… Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Follow Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores why columns look the way they do — in particular, the leave-strewn Corinthian columns you’ll often see on buildings (both old and new). These leaves actually have an originating myth courtesy of the writer Vitruvius, crediting Callimachus for the Corinthian column design. The acanthus leaves on the column have remained consistent over millennia, and, over time, have come to represent more than just a sturdy plant. They’re on display in this video at the...

How dead is the Great Barrier Reef?

Coral bleaching is the biggest threat to the Great Barrier Reef. But it's too early for obituaries. Start your Audible 30-day free trial at http://www.audible.com/vox Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: https://www.eposters.net/pdfs/the-2014-2016-global-coral-bleaching-event-preliminary-comparisons-between-thermal-stress-and.pdf http://www.globalcoralbleaching.org/ http://catlinseaviewsurvey.com/gallery https://www.coralcoe.org.au/media-releases/two-thirds-of-great-barrier-reef-hit-by-back-to-back-mass-coral-bleaching https://www.coris.noaa.gov/activities/reef_managers_guide/reef_managers_guide.pdf https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms12093 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0114321 https://www.nature.com/articles/srep39666 https://www.flickr.com/search/?user_id=61021753%40N02&view_all=1&text=coral NBC 1970 https://archive.org/details/greatbarrierreef Guillaume Debever https://vimeo.com/82607901 Martin Lalonde https://vimeo.com/119572437 Australia's Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef system in the world and the only living structure visible from space. Although ecosystem managers in Australia have worked hard to preserve the reefs, the past couple of decades have brought a new threat that can't be solved by any one country alone: human-induced global warming. Rising ocean temperatures have caused mass coral bleaching in coral...

How an MS Paint artist made this picture

Pat Hines used MS Paint for all the illustrations in his book. Here's how. Check out Pat's work here: http://facebook.com/campredblood http://facebook.com/captainredblood https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07143FXZ5 We've also created 2 videos that show the entire process (YouTube has a 12 hour limit - Pat spent 15 hours making this picture). Part 1: https://youtu.be/OREayzbrO3k Part 2: https://youtu.be/aHYAZcd6NbU In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards interviews an artist using an unlikely tool: MS Paint. Microsoft Paint isn't known as the best artistic tool. But Pat Hines used it to create the illustrations for his horror fantasy, Camp Redblood. And the results are incredible. He explains how Microsoft Paint works for him, and includes notes about...

The 'duck curve' is solar energy's greatest challenge

Renewables require change in the energy supply chain. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Electricity is incredibly difficult to store, so grid operators have to generate it at the exact moment it is demanded. In order to do this, they create incredibly accurate models of the total electric loads, that is how much energy will be consumed on a given day. But as utilities started to produce more energy from renewable sources like solar, the models started to shift as well. California researchers discovered a peculiarity in their state’s electric load curves, that started to look more and more like a duck. And that...

This jet fighter is a disaster, but Congress keeps buying it

Trump says the F-35 is too expensive and he's not wrong. But this is what he's up against. Sources: 1:09 http://www.mckinsey.com/industries/public-sector/our-insights/defense-offsets-from-contractual-burden-to-competitive-weapon 1:15 https://www.sipri.org/databases/armstransfers 1:49 http://tucson.com/business/tucson/major-raytheon-expansion-could-bring-nearly-jobs-to-tucson/article_9509443f-390a-5c37-8861-9fb45179c5ab.html http://www.dailybreeze.com/article/zz/20130503/NEWS/130509581 http://www.boeing.com/company/general-info/#/employment-data 2:44 http://www.politico.com/story/2015/08/is-lockheed-martin-too-big-too-fail-121203 3:58 http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/12/business/boeing-s-war-footing-lobbyists-are-its-army-washington-its-battlefield.html http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2002/06/uncle-sam-buys-an-airplane/302509/ 4:24 https://www.f35.com/about/economic-impact 4:44 http://www.businessinsider.com/this-map-explains-the-f-35-fiasco-2014-8 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Lockheed Martin F-35 is the Pentagon's newest fighter jet. In a single tweet, Trump called to cancel the program. But the F-35 can't be cancelled because its deeply embedded in American politics, military and economy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the...

The Terrifying Truth About Bananas

Hank loves bananas and is worried about their future, so he did some investigating and wrote this episode of SciShow to share some kinda scary banana truths with us. Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow -- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-6uzR

How to solve problems like a designer

The design process for problem-solving, in 4 steps. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Many thanks to Tim Brown and TED for this interview we recorded at TED 2017. IDEO is an international design company founded in 1991. In the beginning, IDEO designed products—the first notebook-style computer, hard drives, even the next generation (of its time) PalmPilots. Most notably, in 1980, the firm was tasked by Steve Jobs to design a more affordable mouse for the Apple Lisa computer. By 2001, IDEO stepped away from designing products and pivoted to designing experiences. The process to solving problems, whether they be simple or complex,...

Why underdogs do better in hockey than basketball

A statistical analysis of luck vs skill in sports. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A07FR4W/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 https://sportchart.wordpress.com/2014/05/30/athlete-sizes-update/ http://www.insidethebook.com/ee/index.php/site/comments/true_talent_levels_for_sports_leagues/ http://blog.philbirnbaum.com/2013/01/luck-vs-talent-in-nhl-standings.html http://harvardsportsanalysis.org/2013/09/undeserving-champions-examining-variance-in-the-postseason/ /// In his book, The Success Equation, Michael Mauboussin places sports on the skill-luck continuum by using a statistical technique earlier demonstrated by sports data analysts. He found that season standings for the NBA reflect skill levels more so than the seasons of other major team sports, with NHL hockey being the sport closest to the luck side of the continuum. In this video we explore the characteristics of the sports that either enhance or diminish the influence of luck on the results, and we'll walk through the method...

How QWERTY conquered keyboards

There's a big chance your keyboard says QWERTY. In this episode of Vox's Overrated, Phil Edwards investigates the keyboard's history. Find Overrated on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/OverratedThe... Find Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ If you've ever been curious about typewriter history, the rise of QWERTY wasn't an accident. Typing and typewriters weren't always around, and the inventor of the QWERTY typewriter layout didn't know it would become the standard. Over time, however, business reasons and typing education made QWERTY a standard across the industry and, eventually, for the vast majority of typists. Though there are exceptions to QWERTY's domination, for the most part, this keyboard...

Why the ocean is getting louder

What the world sounds like underwater. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO We often think of the ocean as a quiet, peaceful place, filled with animals that don't make much noise. So when I went diving in the ocean for the first time, I was surprised at how rich the soundscape around me was: you could hear fish nibbling on coral and squid swimming past you. But more than anything, you could almost always hear the hum of a boat engine. It's part of a big problem in the ocean right now. Ship traffic noise has doubled every decade since the 1960s — and...

The formula for selling a million-dollar work of art

Some dead sharks are worth $12 million. The biggest factor in the price of art often isn't quality, or effort – it's branding. But when a new artist steps into the art market, he or she has no reputation – no branding. That's where art dealers come in. They promote, educate, and help artists to gain fame and success. To learn more about the economics of the art market, you can get Don Thompson's "The $12 Million Stuff Shark" here: https://www.amazon.com/Million-Stuffed-Shark-Economics-Contemporary/dp/0230620590 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines....

The Little Plane War

Build your website for 10% off over at http://squarespace.com/wendover Subscribe to this new channel from Wendover Productions: https://www.youtube.com/halfasinteresting Check out my podcast with Brian from Real Engineering: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/showmakers/id1224583218?mt=2 (iTunes link) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_10vJJqf2ZK0lWrb5BXAPg (YouTube link) Support Wendover Productions on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wendoverproductions Get a Wendover Productions t-shirt for $20: https://store.dftba.com/products/wendover-productions-shirt Youtube: http://www.YouTube.com/WendoverProductions Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/WendoverPro Email: WendoverProductions@gmail.com Reddit: http://Reddit.com/r/WendoverProductions Animation by Josh Sherrington (https://www.youtube.com/heliosphere) Sound by Graham Haerther (http://www.Haerther.net) Thumbnail by Joe Cieplinski (http://joecieplinski.com/) E175 footage courtesy PDX Aviation Boeing footage courtesy Boeing Airbus footage courtesy Airbus Bombardier footage courtesy Bombardier Music: "Wake Up" by Kai Engel and "Bass Vibes Rollin at 5" by Kevin Macleod Big thanks to Patreon supporters: Kevin Song, Kevin Song, David Cichowski, Andy Tran, Victor Zimmer, Paul Jihoon...

Why every American graduation plays the same song

We're all familiar with Pomp & Circumstance, the graduation song that's the official soundtrack of almost every commencement. But how did it get so big? In this episode of Vox's Almanac, Phil Edwards investigates and finds diamonds, war, and Dame Clara Butt. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Pomp & Circumstance has long been a graduation anthem. Part of Edward Elgar's infamous military marches, the tune was composed in the midst of the Boer War, a conflict that expanded the British empire in search of diamonds and gold. When the song...

Top 15 Most Amazing Technologies Inspired by Nature

There's a test lab that's been running intensive R&D that you can turn to for ingenious solutions. Prepare to be amazed by these top 15 examples of biomimicry - tech inspired by nature. Subscribe for more! ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedSubscribe ◄ Stay updated ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedFacebook https://twitter.com/BeAmazedVideos https://instagram.com/BeAmazedVideos◄ For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: beamazedvideos@gmail.com Credit: https://pastebin.com/zYNF1iMi Be Amazed by… Gecko Skin - When you think of geckos, you probably picture a talking lizard pitching you car insurance . Moth Eyes and Solar Panels - When scientists at North Carolina University wanted to make thin solar panels more efficient, they had an eye...

Japanese Math Professor Excellent Optical Illusionist

Japanese mathematics professor Kokichi Sugihara spends much of his time in a world where up is down and three dimensions are really only two. Professor Sugihara is one of the world's leading exponents of optical illusion, a mathematical art-form that he says could have application in the real world. For more news and videos visit ☛ http://ntd.tv Follow us on Twitter ☛ http://twitter.com/NTDTelevision Add us on Facebook ☛ http://on.fb.me/s5KV2C Three sloped ramps are aligned along three of the four sides of a square. Each ramp appears to be sloped in the same direction but when a marble is placed at one end of the...

The origin of the '80s aesthetic

The design phenomenon that defined the decade Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Read more about the Memphis Group: https://designmuseum.org/memphis http://74.93.158.225/~zanone/MemphisDesign/MemphisDesign_index.html#.U0od5MBDoWw.bitly https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1058/1166/files/memphis_milano.pdf?14149556525736315536 http://www.tunicastudio.com/magazine/issue-no-3/article/memphis-group For more work from the designers: Peter Shire http://petershirestudio.com/ Nathalie Du Pasquier http://www.nathaliedupasquier.com/home2.html Michele De Lucchi http://archive.amdl.it/en/index-search.asp?q=memphis&x=0&y=0 Aldo Cibic https://www.cibicworkshop.com/article/memphis-design-movement /// Memphis Design movement dominated the '80s with their crazy patterns and vibrant colors. Many designers and architects from all around the world contributed to the movement in order to escape from the strict rules of modernism. Although their designs didn't end up in people's homes, they inspired many designers working in different mediums. After their first show in Milan in 1981, everything from fashion to music videos became influenced by...