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The secret chord that makes Christmas music sound so Christmassy
The secret chord that makes Christmas music sound so Christmassy
The secret chord that makes Christmas music sound so Christmassy

The secret chord that makes Christmas music sound so Christmassy - Vox

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Hint: Mariah Carey's "All I Want for Christmas is You" uses it.

For more about the secret chord, read more from Adam Ragusea here: http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/music_box/2014/12/mariah_carey_s_all_i_want_for_christmas_is_you_a_musicological_explanation.html

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