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How the inventor of Mario designs a game
How the inventor of Mario designs a game
How the inventor of Mario designs a game

How the inventor of Mario designs a game - Vox

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Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives, on everything from Taxes to Terrorism to Taylor Swift. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Dean Peterson, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Valerie Lapinski, Mona Lalwani, and the staff of Vox.com. For much much more, head over to www.vox.com. And subscribe so you don't miss a video at http://goo.gl/0bsAjO To write us: joe@vox.com. To request permission to use our videos: permissions@voxmedia.com

Video description
Shigeru Miyamoto's design philosophy, explained.

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Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://goo.gl/0bsAjO to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app.

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Why all world maps are wrong

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The bizarre physics of fire ants

They're not just an animal, they're a material. And that's got engineers interested. // Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For more information about the Hu lab: http://www.hu.gatech.edu/ Red imported fire ants (solenopsis invicta) are native to South America and an invasive species in the United States. One of the adaptations that makes them so hardy is that they can build large structures by linking their bodies together. This is how they form rafts that can float during floods. When they're aggregated together, fire ants can be seen as a material and the Hu lab at Georgia Tech has been testing that material for years. /// Vox.com...

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