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17 Tonnes of Spinning Glass: Making the World's Largest Telescope
17 Tonnes of Spinning Glass: Making the World's Largest Telescope
17 Tonnes of Spinning Glass: Making the World's Largest Telescope

17 Tonnes of Spinning Glass: Making the World's Largest Telescope - Tom Scott

Tom Scott
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Hi, I'm Tom Scott. These are some of the things I've made and done. They'll probably come back to haunt me in a few years' time. (Want to get in touch about anything? Use the "contact me" link below, not YouTube messages!)

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This week's guest video comes from Active Galactic Videos: go subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/ActiveGalacticVideos/ They got to walk on the dish of a telescope: https://www.youtube.com/ActiveGalacticVideos/

At the Richard F. Caris Mirror Lab, under the football stadium of the University of Arizona, there's an enormous rotating furnace, keeping tonnes of glass heated as it forms the mirrors for the Giant Magellan Telescope. Here's a look inside!
How a Giant Telescope Works

From ESOcast, explore the state-of-the-art technology behind the Very Large telescope, which has provided astronomers with an unequalled view of the Universe. To obtain the sharpest images of the sky, the VLT has to cope with two major effects that distort the images of celestial objects. The first one is mirror deformations due to their large sizes. This problem is corrected using a computer-controlled support system — active optics — that ensures that the mirrors keep their desired shapes under all circumstances. The second effect is produced by Earth's atmosphere, which makes stars appear blurry, even with the largest telescopes....

Science vs the Weather: Salford's Energy House

At the University of Salford's Energy House, all the energy use is monitored and controlled, allowing researchers to experiment with all sorts of insulation and energy-saving techniques. But how to control for factors like sun, wind and rain? The solution: put the whole house inside an environmental chamber: a building inside a building that means the weather is controlled, repeatable, and part of the science. Thanks to all the team at the University of Salford's School of Built Environment: you can find more about them, and about the house, here: http://www.salford.ac.uk/built-environment/research/research-centres/applied-buildings-and-energy-research-group And they're on YouTube here; https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCe4nyWoHW3jkNXOyqldsHYQ This video edited by Michelle Martin (@mrsmmartin) I'm...

Tom Fell Through A Frozen Lake In Estonia

On a bench in Tartu, Estonia, we welcome Paul (@cr3) along with art from Simon (@mushybees) to talk about our road trip, an abandoned submarine base, and, yes, the incident where Tom fell through ice into a frozen lake. Also, rainbow Comic Sans. TOM: http://youtube.com/tomscottgo -- MATT: http://youtube.com/unnamedculprit -- PAUL: http://twitter.com/cr3 And thanks to our artist, Simon Coxall, http://twitter.com/mushybees !

Drones vs Lightning ⚡

At the University of Manchester's High Voltage Laboratory, we see what happens when a DJI Phantom 3 drone gets hit with an electrical impulse of 1.4MV - basically, a lightning strike. Actually, two Phantom 3 drones. We had a backup. Thanks to the team at the High Voltage Lab! Here's their side of the story: http://www.mub.eps.manchester.ac.uk/science-engineering/2017/04/10/drone-vs-lightning/ And here's a teardown of the drone: http://www.mub.eps.manchester.ac.uk/science-engineering/2017/05/11/inside-the-drone/ The University of Manchester's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/universitymanchester You can also follow on Twitter: The HV Lab http://twitter.com/HighVoltage_UoM Vidyadhar Peesapati http://twitter.com/DrViddy Manchester Energy http://twitter.com/mcr_energy School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering http://twitter.com/eeemanchester Main camera: Fraser Cottrell / http://www.frasercottrell.com Edited by Michelle Martin / @mrsmmartin Audio mix by Matt Gray...

Here's Why My Cheap Audi R8 was TOTALED! Major Factory Flaw Made my R8 Salvage!

Get Honey for FREE ▸ https://joinhoney.com/samcrac Save $$ this holiday season on sites like Amazon, eBay, AutoPartsWarehouse, Best Buy, J.Crew, TireRack, and more! Found It! We take a look under the hood and figure out why this car was totaled out. This should be an interesting rebuild! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/samcracc/ Email Me: SamcracAuto@gmail.com Mail: Samcrac PO Box 713 Odessa, FL 33556

How To Make Parabolic Mirrors From Space Blankets - NightHawkInLight

Parabolic mirrors are useful for everything from solar power to telescopes to holographic projection. They're usually very difficult to make by traditional means, but this video takes a different approach. Check out my sponsor Rayton Solar here: http://bit.ly/Rayton-Solar With their incredible silicon cutting process via a particle accelerator they're able to make solar panels with virtually zero waste and a higher efficiency result. AN OFFERING STATEMENT REGARDING THIS OFFERING HAS BEEN FILED WITH THE SEC. THE SEC HAS QUALIFIED THAT OFFERING STATEMENT, WHICH ONLY MEANS THAT THE COMPANY MAY MAKE SALES OF THE SECURITIES DESCRIBED BY THE OFFERING STATEMENT. IT DOES NOT MEAN...

A Nuclear Waste Dump You Can Walk On: Weldon Spring, Missouri

In Weldon Spring, Missouri, there is a strange, grey, windblasted seven-storey pile of rocks. It's the Weldon Spring Site: a nuclear and toxic waste dump on the site of an old uranium processing factory. And you can walk on it: it's technically a tourist attraction. That was going to be the whole of my video... and then I did some more research. Filmed by Matt Gray - http://mattg.co.uk - @unnamedculprit I'm at http://tomscott.com on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tomscott on Facebook at http://facebook.com/tomscott and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

This trick got me banned from selling cars on eBay for life

Rob hosts a radio show in Greenville, SC called "Hot Rods & Happy Hour" but he has worked in the car business all his life. When he got out of high school, he started selling cars on eBay for local dealers but eventually eBay took offense to some of his selling practices. • Buy our NEW, LIMITED EDITION t-shirts and gear at our store  - https://vinwiki.com/r/store Be sure to Like, Comment, Subscribe, and Share this with other car enthusiasts! Add to the stories of your cars and the cars you love on VINwiki. Download the free VINwiki iOS App - https://appsto.re/us/ijaAbb.i...

Making Artificial Earthquakes with a Four-Tonne Steel Ball

In Göttingen, Germany, there's a four-tonne steel ball that can be raised up a 14-metre tower -- and then dropped in less than two seconds, crashing back to earth. It makes tiny, artificial earthquakes: here's why. Thanks to all the team at Wiechert'sche Erdbebenwarte Göttingen! You can find out more about them here: https://www.erdbebenwarte.de/ Three things I had to cut out of this video, because they didn't quite fit into the story or because I couldn't film them: The reason the steel ball survived two world wars is because the university's records listed it by use as a "rock-ball", not by composition as...

This new telescope might show us the beginning of the universe | Wendy Freedman

When and how did the universe begin? A global group of astronomers wants to answer that question by peering as far back in time as a large new telescope will let us see. Wendy Freedman headed the creation of the Giant Magellan Telescope, under construction in South America; at TEDGlobal in Rio, she shares a bold vision of the discoveries about our universe that the GMT could make possible. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes...

Why California's Musical Road Sounds Terrible

In Lancaster, California, there's a musical road. When you drive over it, it plays the William Tell Overture. Unfortunately, it's out of tune. Here's why. Thanks to David Simmons-Duffin, who figured this out about nine years ago: http://davidsd.org/2008/12/honda-needs-a-tune-up/ -- he seems to be the first to have figured out not just that it's wrong, but exactly what happened! I'm at http://tomscott.com on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tomscott on Facebook at http://facebook.com/tomscott and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

How Computers Compress Text: Huffman Coding and Huffman Trees

Computers store text (or, at least, English text) as eight bits per character. There are plenty of more efficient ways that could work: so why don't we use them? And how can we fit more text into less space? Let's talk about Huffman coding, Huffman trees, and Will Smith. Thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Computing History: http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/ Thanks to Chris Hanel at Support Class for the graphics: http://supportclass.net Filmed by Tomek: https://youtube.com/tomek And thanks to my proofreading team! I'm at http://tomscott.com on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tomscott on Facebook at http://facebook.com/tomscott and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

The Battery That's Lasted 176 Years

GUEST VIDEO! Go subscribe to Sally's channel: http://youtube.com/sallylepage In a laboratory at Oxford University sits the Oxford Electric Bell, which has spent 176 years constantly ringing. And no-one's quite sure what the battery that powers it is made of... Add Sally on all the social networks: Twitter: http://twitter.com/sallylepage Facebook: http://facebook.com/shedscience Instagram: http://instagram.com/sallylepage Website: http://sallylepage.co.uk Snapchat: sally.lepage Thanks to camera operator Mikayla Hunter: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvv5I_zxSDPFHry1Oexf6pg And thanks to the University of Oxford's Physics Department for letting us film the bell! References: Croft (1984) The Oxford electric bell, Eur. J. Phys. http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0143-0807/5/4/001 Croft (1985) The Oxford dry pile, Clarendon Laboratory Historical Notes No. 3 The Clarendon Dry Pile, Department of Physics website http://www.physics.ox.ac.uk/history.asp?page=exhibit1

Giant Magellan Telescope - the World's Largest Multiple Mirror Telescope

The Giant Magellan Telescope will be the largest telescope ever built when it sees first light in 2023. In this video, we'll learn how GMT is made and how it will open a giant new window on the cosmos. Special thanks to the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization for their use of GMT images and videos. Visit http://www.gmto.org/ to learn more. 🔴 Watch more telescope videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLrAnGxL8nxOHR01diTRdgqhUto6Jqxgx9 🔴 Share this video with a friend: https://youtu.be/vvllbWCwFTo 🔴 Music: "Love Song" by Max McFerren CC-BY 4.0 "But Enough About Me, Bill Paxton" by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/dtv/ Artist: http://chriszabriskie.com/

The US President's Bulletproof Railcar

US Car Number 1, the Ferdinand Magellan, sits in the Gold Coast Railway Museum in Miami. It's 120 tonnes of bulletproof, armoured railcar: a train carriage designed to move the President of the United States around the country in safety and style. At least, it was, until other transport came along to do a better job. Thanks to all the team at the Gold Coast Railroad Museum: they're at http://www.gcrm.org/, or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/GoldCoastRailroad/ ! [looks like their main site's down at the moment!] Edited by Michelle Martin (@mrsmmartin) I'm at http://tomscott.com on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tomscott on Facebook at http://facebook.com/tomscott and on Snapchat and Instagram...

Making an International Standard Cup of Tea

As far as I can find, no-one has actually made a International Standard Cup of Tea - ISO 3103 or BS 6008 - for the internet before. Lots of people have talked about it, but that's easy. Making one? That requires precision... and some specialist equipment. You can buy a professional tea tasting set from this Amazon UK affiliate link: https://amzn.to/2qfbxyr Thanks to Morag Hickman for letting me borrow her workshop for last-minute filming! She makes beautiful jewellery, like ring-keepers, dragon necklaces and rings that looks like ocean waves: https://etsy.com/shop/Errant Update: someone has found an earlier ISO cup of tea on the internet,...

How Zero-G Planes Work

The European Space Agency offered me a seat on their zero-g plane: it's an Airbus A310 that flies parabolic maneuvers, pulling up into the sky and then arcing back down, giving its passengers about 20 seconds of weightlessness (or "microgravity") at a time. Here's how it works. Some people would have filmed their script on the ground, and just messed about while floating. I decided to go for something a bit more challenging. ** If you're a masters or PhD student from an ESA member state, and zero-g sounds like your thing, have a look at the Fly Your Thesis program: http://www.esa.int/Education/Fly_Your_Thesis --...

Tilting an Icy Floor Until You Fall Over: WinterLab

If you're in Canada, you need good winter boots. But how do you know whether they're actually safe, or whether you'll fall over the first time you step on ice? This is WinterLab, part of the Challenging Environment Assessment Laboratories at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, where they're testing winter shoes with science. More about the lab and their ratings: http://www.ratemytreads.com/ Thanks to Evan from Rare Earth for being camera op! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtGG8ucQgEJPeUPhJZ4M4jA Edited by Michelle Martin (@mrsmmartin) I'm at http://tomscott.com on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tomscott on Facebook at http://facebook.com/tomscott and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

How Large Can a Telescope Be?

From ESOCast: on clear nights we can look up at the stars and marvel at the vastness of the universe. Our eyes quickly adapt to the dark. As our pupils widen, more light streams onto our retinas and fainter stars become more visible. But the light-collecting area of the human eye is tiny. To peer much deeper into the night sky astronomers need telescopes with enormous primary mirrors. How large does modern technology allow us to build telescopes? How far into space can they see?

Archimedes and a Boat Lift: the Falkirk Wheel

http://tomscott.com - http://twitter.com/tomscott - The Falkirk Wheel sits between Edinburgh and Glasgow, in the southern parts of Scotland, and it's the world's only rotating boat lift. There's some very clever design going on here -- and some physics that goes all the way back to Ancient Greece.

Is It Dangerous To Talk To A Camera While Driving?

I'm visiting the University of Iowa's National Advanced Driving Simulator, to answer a question: how unsafe is it for me to vlog while driving? Is vlogging while driving dangerous? The team at the simulator are the experts to ask. More about the National Advanced Driving Simulator: https://www.nads-sc.uiowa.edu/sim_nads1.php or on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrivingSim Camera operator: Jasmine Putney Edited: Michelle Martin (@mrsmmartin) I'm at http://tomscott.com on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tomscott on Facebook at http://facebook.com/tomscott and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

Why Apple Products Are Getting So Expensive

Apple has almost always had a reputation of pricing their products quite a bit higher than their competition, and this premium cost is commonly referred to as the Apple Tax. And it can be traced as far back as the original iPod in 2001, which had a starting price of $399, or about $570 adjusted for inflation. And when compared to other hard drive-based music players that sold for around $200, the iPod’s price was staggering. And when the iPhone was released in 2007, one of its biggest criticisms was its price, coming in at $499, or about $600 today,...

The World's Most Famous Teapot: The Utah Teapot

At the Computer History Museum, in Mountain View, California, there sits a small teapot. It's the world's most famous teapot, after a computer graphics researcher called Martin Newell digitised it. You've probably seen it: here's its story. And thanks to the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California: you can visit them online here: http://www.computerhistory.org/ I'm at http://www.tomscott.com/ on Facebook at http://facebook.com/tomscott on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tomscott and on Instagram and Snapchat as tomscottgo